December 2016  
SMTWTFS
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
     
Upcoming Events
DEC

11

SUN
Adult Education
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
After Fellowship
CC/DN AA
7:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Note first Sunday of the month is 6-8 pm. All other Sundays are from 7-8 pm. Meetings in the Surf Room, just off the Church lobby.
DEC

14

WED
Sobriety by the Sea
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM
In the Surf Room, just off the Church lobby.
DEC

15

THU
Al-Anooners
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
11:45am-1:15pm except Thanksgiving. In the Surf Room, just off the Church lobby.
DEC

16

FRI
Windy Weavers
1:00 PM to 5:00 PM
In St. Paul's Trinity Center
DEC

18

SUN
CC/DN AA
7:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Note first Sunday of the month is 6-8 pm. All other Sundays are from 7-8 pm. Meetings in the Surf Room, just off the Church lobby.
DEC

21

WED
Sobriety by the Sea
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM
In the Surf Room, just off the Church lobby.
DEC

22

THU
Al-Anooners
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
11:45am-1:15pm except Thanksgiving. In the Surf Room, just off the Church lobby.
DEC

23

FRI
Windy Weavers
1:00 PM to 5:00 PM
In St. Paul's Trinity Center
DEC

24

SAT
Christmas Eve Service
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM
Christmas Eve services will start with caroling at 7 PM, followed by the Christmas Eve Candlelight Service at 7:30 PM.
DEC

25

SUN
Adult Education
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
Afet Fellowship
CC/DN AA
7:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Note first Sunday of the month is 6-8 pm. All other Sundays are from 7-8 pm. Meetings in the Surf Room, just off the Church lobby.
Bible Search
Weather
  • 4th Sunday of Advent
  • Welcome to St. Paul's Episcopal Church
  • Blowing out the candles is always a big adventure
  • Cash enjoys Blessing of the animals
  • Jeannine participates with True North at Candidate Forum
  • Crucifer in training

Welcome to

St. Paul's Episcopal Church!

Crescent City, California 

Please browse through our website and get to know us.  You're welcome to join us for Sunday worship at 10 am or for any of the upcoming events you find listed on this site.

We think you'll find a warm and friendly extended family at St. Paul's.  Please join us as we share and receive God's love, hope, joy and vision.  Join us as a community to reach out and serve others. We look forward to meeting you!

 

Christ's Blessings,
David Shewmaker+
Priest-in-charge

 

 

Contact Us  
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
220 E. Macken Ave.
Crescent City, California 95531
Map  •   Directions
Phone 707-464-2708
Announcements
Standing Rock Sioux

Presiding Bishop Michael Curry: Statement in support of the advocacy of the people of Standing Rock Sioux Reservation

 
1
August 25, 2016

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry has issued the following statement in support of the advocacy of the people of Standing Rock Sioux Reservation.

 

“Water is a gift from the creator, respect it, and protect it.”  I was deeply moved by these words printed on the sign of a person standing with hundreds of others to protect the Missouri River.  In the Episcopal Church, when we baptize a new follower of Jesus Christ, we pray these words over the water of baptism.  “We thank you, Almighty God, for the gift of water.” We then recall how God used water to bless his people in the Bible, from the story of creation in Genesis, the emancipation of Hebrew slaves in Exodus, to the baptism of the Lord Jesus in the River Jordan.  Indeed, “Water is a gift from the creator.” To sustain it and to protect it is to “safeguard the integrity of God’s creation,” and therefore to protect human and other forms of life created by Almighty God.  That work warrants our full and prayerful support.

The people of Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, standing in solidarity with hundreds of other indigenous nations and allies, are calling us anew to respect and protect this sacred gift of God, and in so doing to respect and protect God's gift of human life.  In protesting the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, they recognize the gift of water to all of us, a gift given to us by our Creator.  The Sioux remind us “mni wiconi” or “water is life.” This God-given resource courses through our mighty rivers and our human veins, working to renew and reinvigorate all of creation.

We are called to do our part to urge decision makers to recognize and honor the efforts to protect the sacred water and burial grounds threatened by the Dakota Access Pipeline. The Pipeline, if completed, would stretch over one thousand miles and transport 540,000 barrels of crude oil through hallowed North Dakota burial grounds every day. A rupture in its infrastructure could wreak untold havoc on the Sioux and catastrophically pollute the Missouri River, a sacred tributary that the Sioux people depend upon for their daily water. 

I stand with the people of Standing Rock in their efforts to respect and protect the Missouri River. We know that the right to clean water is an internationally recognized human right and that all too often indigenous communities, other people of color, and our most vulnerable communities throughout the world are the ones most at risk of losing access to clean water.  As we join the people of Standing Rock, we also recognize that their stand is one that joins the fight for racial justice and reconciliation with climate justice and caring for God's creation as a matter of stewardship.

This stand of men, women and children is also an important moment in the life of indigenous people. The Sioux people’s advocacy efforts to protect the Missouri River and the sacred burial grounds threatened by the oil pipeline is truly historic.  Leaders of Standing Rock observe that it’s been over 140 years since such a unified call for respect and justice has been made.  The Episcopal Church has a long record of advocating that government, corporations and other societal players respect the treaty rights of Native peoples. Standing alongside our Sioux brothers and sisters, we continue this legacy today.

The people of Standing Rock Sioux Reservation are calling us now to stand with Native peoples, not only for their sakes, but for the sake of God’s creation, for the sake of the entire human family, and for the children and generations of children yet unborn. The legendary Sioux Chief Sitting Bull reminds us: “Let us put our minds together and see what life we can make for our children.”  There is the urgent need of this calling.

So, while we cannot all physically stand in the Camp of Sacred Stones today, let us hold, both in spoken word and silent prayer, the aspirations of the Sioux people and urge our policymakers to protect and responsibly steward our water, the sacred gift from God that sustains us all.

 

 

  +Michael B. Curry
  Presiding Bishop and Primate
  The Episcopal Church

 

Presiding Bishop Michael Curry: Statement in support of the advocacy of the people of Standing Rock Sioux Reservation

 
Total votes: 11
August 25, 2016

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry has issued the following statement in support of the advocacy of the people of Standing Rock Sioux Reservation.

 

“Water is a gift from the creator, respect it, and protect it.”  I was deeply moved by these words printed on the sign of a person standing with hundreds of others to protect the Missouri River.  In the Episcopal Church, when we baptize a new follower of Jesus Christ, we pray these words over the water of baptism.  “We thank you, Almighty God, for the gift of water.” We then recall how God used water to bless his people in the Bible, from the story of creation in Genesis, the emancipation of Hebrew slaves in Exodus, to the baptism of the Lord Jesus in the River Jordan.  Indeed, “Water is a gift from the creator.” To sustain it and to protect it is to “safeguard the integrity of God’s creation,” and therefore to protect human and other forms of life created by Almighty God.  That work warrants our full and prayerful support.

The people of Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, standing in solidarity with hundreds of other indigenous nations and allies, are calling us anew to respect and protect this sacred gift of God, and in so doing to respect and protect God's gift of human life.  In protesting the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, they recognize the gift of water to all of us, a gift given to us by our Creator.  The Sioux remind us “mni wiconi” or “water is life.” This God-given resource courses through our mighty rivers and our human veins, working to renew and reinvigorate all of creation.

We are called to do our part to urge decision makers to recognize and honor the efforts to protect the sacred water and burial grounds threatened by the Dakota Access Pipeline. The Pipeline, if completed, would stretch over one thousand miles and transport 540,000 barrels of crude oil through hallowed North Dakota burial grounds every day. A rupture in its infrastructure could wreak untold havoc on the Sioux and catastrophically pollute the Missouri River, a sacred tributary that the Sioux people depend upon for their daily water. 

I stand with the people of Standing Rock in their efforts to respect and protect the Missouri River. We know that the right to clean water is an internationally recognized human right and that all too often indigenous communities, other people of color, and our most vulnerable communities throughout the world are the ones most at risk of losing access to clean water.  As we join the people of Standing Rock, we also recognize that their stand is one that joins the fight for racial justice and reconciliation with climate justice and caring for God's creation as a matter of stewardship.

This stand of men, women and children is also an important moment in the life of indigenous people. The Sioux people’s advocacy efforts to protect the Missouri River and the sacred burial grounds threatened by the oil pipeline is truly historic.  Leaders of Standing Rock observe that it’s been over 140 years since such a unified call for respect and justice has been made.  The Episcopal Church has a long record of advocating that government, corporations and other societal players respect the treaty rights of Native peoples. Standing alongside our Sioux brothers and sisters, we continue this legacy today.

The people of Standing Rock Sioux Reservation are calling us now to stand with Native peoples, not only for their sakes, but for the sake of God’s creation, for the sake of the entire human family, and for the children and generations of children yet unborn. The legendary Sioux Chief Sitting Bull reminds us: “Let us put our minds together and see what life we can make for our children.”  There is the urgent need of this calling.

So, while we cannot all physically stand in the Camp of Sacred Stones today, let us hold, both in spoken word and silent prayer, the aspirations of the Sioux people and urge our policymakers to protect and responsibly steward our water, the sacred gift from God that sustains us all.

 

 

  +Michael B. Curry
  Presiding Bishop and Primate
  The Episcopal Church

 

Congratulations to the new deacons, especially Mara.
Regular Schedule  
Sunday
  • 10:00 AM
    Holy Eucharist
Affiliations